Posts Tagged ‘parenting’

Check out this cool article on volunteering for kids!

Best Volunteer Opportunities For Kids In Detroit « CBS Detroit.

Volunteering with your Family

Convince yourself and your spouse
I know, I know, volunteer work probably isn’t the first thing that comes to mind when we say ‘R&R’—after all, you’re committed to the ultimate 24-hour volunteer job: parenting.  You may have a stressful job, maybe even two! However, this stress only gives you more reason to put aside time to spend with the family. Theme parks and travel can be expensive, volunteer work is free. It’s just as educational as a museum and often just as fun. Many have fun perks, giving you access to sports and other activities you would have paid for otherwise. You can put your hobbies to great use and do it all with the whole family.

Convince the Kids
Elementary school kids love to volunteer. I remember fighting over the broom during fourth grade chore time. If you present  these guys a few choices of programs, chances are they’ll go for it! You’re biggest road block will be finding a kid-friendly volunteer organization. Luckily, they exist! Try organizations involving gardening/permaculture, animals or other kids! Check out Compassionate kids for more info!

Convince the Tweens and Teens
This will be tough. They’re going through that phase when doing anything that they don’t have to do seems unreasonable, especially if means being around you. This stage will pass, it may take a while, but it will pass. Not too long ago (less than a decade) I was in their position: bored, frustrated, seeking independence with no car, looking to make connections in my new teen world. I know their motivations—one of which is cutting down homework. Many teachers will give extra credit for volunteer work, so why not ask? Some opportunities go well with the curriculum: history teachers will love seeing your teen volunteer with local museums, science teachers will delight as teens volunteer during natural disasters or with hospitals. If the opportunity is long term, they might even get school credit! Suggest teen-centered volunteer opportunities as a way to make friends. Perhaps even grant amnesty for other family events if they volunteer with you.

Convincing the Juniors and Seniors
These guys are probably as busy as you are, but that can work to your advantage. Not only is it a break from homework and stress, it’s productive procrastination! They know volunteer work looks good on a college and scholarship applications—especially if it’s something they’re passionate about. Volunteering may be one of the last chances you get to spend time as a family before they go off to college—because you don’t have to travel very far, these soon-to-be-graduates won’t have to sacrifice their summer jobs like they would for a family vacation.
How has volunteering brought your family together?